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Case Study: Stigmatization of a HIV+ Haitian Male

  • Larry Purnell
  • Dula Pacquiao
  • Marilyn “Marty” Douglas
Chapter

Abstract

Ronald is a 27-year-old homosexual man with a high school education who recently emigrated from Haiti to a large urban area in the United States. His parents and two siblings emigrated 8 years earlier because of the country’s political unrest. At that time, Ronald remained with relatives because he did not want to leave his friends. While working in Haiti, Ronald was hospitalized for pneumonia, at which time he was diagnosed with HIV. He did not reveal his HIV status for fear of discrimination. Even though homosexuality in Haiti is legal, it remains a taboo. Ronald joined the local voodoo community because of its acceptance of homosexuals. Ronald joined his parents in the United States to receive better healthcare for his HIV+ condition than was possible in Haiti. He was concerned, however, about his poor English language proficiency. His parents successfully applied for Ronald to immigrate under the Cuban Haitian Entrant Program (US Citizenship and Immigration Services 2015).

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Larry Purnell
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Dula Pacquiao
    • 4
    • 5
  • Marilyn “Marty” Douglas
    • 6
  1. 1.School of NursingUniversity of DelawareNewarkUSA
  2. 2.Florida International UniversityMiamiUSA
  3. 3.Excelsior CollegeAlbanyUSA
  4. 4.Center for Multicultural Education, Research and Practice, School of NursingRutgers UniversityNewarkUSA
  5. 5.School of NursingUniversity of Hawaii, HiloHiloUSA
  6. 6.School of NursingUniversity of California, San FranciscoSan FranciscoUSA

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