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Billingham: “The Synthetic”

  • Anthony S. Travis
Chapter
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Abstract

The President of the British Nitrogen and Carbide Company expressed the opinion that it was hardly probable that the Haber-Bosch process could be extended much outside Germany because the operation of its costly and complicated plants presumes a high technical capacity.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anthony S. Travis
    • 1
  1. 1.Sidney M. Edelstein Center for the History and Philosophy of Science, Technology and MedicineThe Hebrew University of JerusalemJerusalemIsrael

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