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Ammonium Sulphate

  • Anthony S. Travis
Chapter
  • 375 Downloads

Abstract

Throughout the period under review here, ammonium sulphate, because of its several sources, was the most important nitrogen fertilizer. The sulphate’s industrial origins ranged from coal-based processes—namely the coal gas and coke oven works—to production from calcium cyanamide and then synthetic ammonia. By the mid-1920s, ammonium sulphate made from the nitrogen capture processes had considerably reduced demand for Chilean nitrate.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anthony S. Travis
    • 1
  1. 1.Sidney M. Edelstein Center for the History and Philosophy of Science, Technology and MedicineThe Hebrew University of JerusalemJerusalemIsrael

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