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Agricultural Chemistry

  • Anthony S. Travis
Chapter
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Abstract

Justus Liebig (1803–1873) is closely associated with promotion of the scientific development of agricultural chemistry. The career of this famous German chemist falls into two periods: before 1840 as organic chemist; and after 1840, in connection with agriculture. In 1825 at the University of Giessen he established a laboratory that served as a pharmaceutical-chemical institute. In 1831 he developed a method for the elemental analysis of organic substances, for which he gained considerable fame. Until 1835, most of his students qualified in pharmacy. Between 1839 and 1842, during which time enrolments increased considerably, his students intended to take up posts as either chemists in industry or as teachers, or they entered into government service (Fig. 2.1) [1]. It was at this time that Liebig turned to the application of science to agriculture and soon attracted to his laboratory students interested in food supply as well as medicine.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anthony S. Travis
    • 1
  1. 1.Sidney M. Edelstein Center for the History and Philosophy of Science, Technology and MedicineThe Hebrew University of JerusalemJerusalemIsrael

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