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Nobel Prizes and a New Technology

  • Anthony S. Travis
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Abstract

The nitrogen capture story and the diversification that it spawned as told in the foregoing undoubtedly represents one of the pinnacles of human achievement. Despite the tremendous amount published on the subject it needs also to be read against a more general background. With this in mind, here and in the closing chapters we return briefly to some earlier themes, though mainly in the post-1918 period, and consider the diversity of certain social, political and economic conditions that impacted on the ways in which nitrogen technologies were taken up. We start with what many would call the ultimate accolade recognizing the success of nitrogen capture, the Nobel Prize.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anthony S. Travis
    • 1
  1. 1.Sidney M. Edelstein Center for the History and Philosophy of Science, Technology and MedicineThe Hebrew University of JerusalemJerusalemIsrael

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