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Imperial Japan: From Cyanamide to Synthetic Ammonia

  • Anthony S. Travis
Chapter
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Abstract

Physical chemistry was introduced into Japan in the late nineteenth century by Sakuria Joji (1858–1936) at Tokyo Imperial University, and by the early 1900s had a strong following among Western-trained scholars [1, 2]. The leader among Japanese academics in nitrogen capture and the ammonia equilibrium was Tamaru Setsuro, who in 1913 introduced chemist Suzuki Tatsuji—from 1915 director of the Yokohama Chemical Research Laboratory—then in Germany to Fritz Haber. This was enough to convince Suzuki of the superiority of Haber’s method over other methods of nitrogen capture then in use—that is, cyanamide and electric arc processes.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anthony S. Travis
    • 1
  1. 1.Sidney M. Edelstein Center for the History and Philosophy of Science, Technology and MedicineThe Hebrew University of JerusalemJerusalemIsrael

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