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Scaphoid Fracture

  • Anica Herlyn
  • Alice Wichelhaus
Chapter

Abstract

60% of scaphoid fractures affect the modestly supplied scaphoid waist; 15% involve the scarcely supplied proximal and densely supplied distal third; and 10% involve the tuberculum ossis scaphoidei. Because of its peculiar blood supply and the fact that more than two-thirds of the scaphoid bone is covered by articular cartilage, fractures are at high risk of delayed union or nonunion. For scaphoid fractures with any pathologic angulation, displacement, or carpal malalignment, arthroscopic-assisted or open reduction and fixation are recommended if any concerns exist regarding fracture stability. The following article demonstrates all steps from preoperative planning, patient set-up in theatre, closed and open reduction manoeuvres to the open dorsal and volar approaches for proximal pole scaphoid fractures and followed insertion of the commonly used cannulated titan double-threaded compression screw extensively.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Dept. of Trauma, Hand and Reconstructive SurgeryUniversity of Rostock, Medical CenterRostockGermany

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