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Patient-Specific Skeletal Muscle Fiber Modeling from Structure Tensor Field of Clinical CT Images

  • Yoshito OtakeEmail author
  • Futoshi Yokota
  • Norio Fukuda
  • Masaki Takao
  • Shu Takagi
  • Naoto Yamamura
  • Lauren J. O’Donnell
  • Carl-Fredrik Westin
  • Nobuhiko Sugano
  • Yoshinobu Sato
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 10433)

Abstract

We propose an optimization method for estimating patient-specific muscle fiber arrangement from clinical CT. Our approach first computes the structure tensor field to estimate local orientation, then a geometric template representing fiber arrangement is fitted using a B-spline deformation by maximizing fitness of the local orientation using a smoothness penalty. The initialization is computed with a previously proposed algorithm that takes account of only the muscle’s surface shape. Evaluation was performed using a CT volume (1.0 mm\(^\text {3}\)/voxel) and high resolution optical images of a serial cryo-section (0.1 mm\(^\text {3}\)/voxel). The mean fiber distance error at the initialization of 6.00 mm was decreased to 2.78 mm after the proposed optimization for the gluteus maximus muscle, and from 5.28 mm to 3.09 mm for the gluteus medius muscle. The result from 20 patient CT images suggested that the proposed algorithm reconstructed an anatomically more plausible fiber arrangement than the previous method.

Keywords

Muscle fiber modeling Fiber arrangement Clinical CT 

Notes

Acknowledgement

This research was supported by MEXT/JSPS KAKENHI 26108004, JST PRESTO 20407, AMED/ETH the strategic Japanese-Swiss cooperative research program, NIH grant U01CA199459 and P41EB015902. The authors extend their appreciation to Prof. Min Suk Chung (Ajou University School of Medicine) for providing us the Visible Korean Human dataset.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yoshito Otake
    • 1
    Email author
  • Futoshi Yokota
    • 1
  • Norio Fukuda
    • 1
  • Masaki Takao
    • 2
  • Shu Takagi
    • 3
  • Naoto Yamamura
    • 3
  • Lauren J. O’Donnell
    • 4
  • Carl-Fredrik Westin
    • 4
  • Nobuhiko Sugano
    • 3
  • Yoshinobu Sato
    • 1
  1. 1.Graduate School of Information ScienceNara Institute of Science and TechnologyIkomaJapan
  2. 2.Graduate School of MedicineOsaka UniversitySuitaJapan
  3. 3.Department of Mechanical EngineeringThe University of TokyoTokyoJapan
  4. 4.Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA

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