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How Documentation of Practice Contributes to Construction and Reconstruction of an Understanding of Learning and Teaching

  • Linda R. Kroll
Chapter

Abstract

Learning to teach requires constant construction and reconstruction of one’s teaching, lessons, classroom management, philosophy, and a devotion to an inquiry stance toward practice. This chapter demonstrates how documentation of practice is used to support both students and teachers. Student teachers can learn to use documentation to identify questions, investigate children’s learning as well as their own, and connect this learning to the accountability measures in place. These practices enable them to regard teaching as a learning profession.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Linda R. Kroll
    • 1
  1. 1.School of EducationMills CollegeOaklandUSA

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