Advertisement

The Minority Nationalist Party Family and the European Cleavage

  • Margarita Gómez-Reino
Chapter
  • 277 Downloads
Part of the Palgrave Studies in European Political Sociology book series (PSEPS)

Abstract

Minority nationalist parties have both ideological and strategic reasons to adopt Europhile views. Ideologically, support for European integration evolves from the defense of self-government and identities in opposition to nation-states. Strategically, minority nationalist parties aim at occupying political space as the defenders of territorial identities and interests in the European Union. This chapter treats ideological and strategic considerations as mutually reinforcing and examines the politicization of European integration through the evolution of the position and salience for minority nationalist parties. The empirical analysis shows a tepid pro-European party family gathering Europhiles, Eurocritics and Eurosceptics as a result of internal ideological differentiation and the limited salience of European integration within the party family.

References

  1. Albertazzi, D., and D. McDonnell. 2005. The Lega Nord in the Second Berlusconi Government: In a League of Its Own. West European Politics 28 (5): 952–972.Google Scholar
  2. Almeida, D. 2012. The Impact of European Integration on Political Parties. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  3. Alonso, S. 2012. Challenging the State: Devolution and the Battle for Partisan Credibility. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  4. Alonso, S., L. Cabeza, and B. Gómez. 2017. Disentangling Peripheral Parties’ Issue Packages in Subnational Elections. Comparative European Politics 15 (2): 240–263.Google Scholar
  5. Anwen, E. 2008. Introduction: Whatever Happened to the Europe of the Regions? Revisiting the Regional Dimension of European Politics. Regional & Federal Studies 18 (5): 483–492.Google Scholar
  6. Corbett, R. 2014. ‘European Elections Are Second-Order Elections’: Is Received Wisdom Changing? Journal of Common Market Studies 52 (6): 1194–1198.Google Scholar
  7. Clark, N., and R. Rohrschneider. 2009. Second-Order Elections Versus First-Order Thinking: How Voters Perceive the Representation Process in a Multi-Layered System of Governance. Journal of European Integration 31 (5): 645–664.Google Scholar
  8. Dandoy, R. 2010. Ethno-Regionalist Parties in Europe: A Typology. Perspectives on Federalism 2 (2): 194–220.Google Scholar
  9. De Wilde, P., and H.-J. Trenz. 2012. Denouncing European Integration: Euroscepticism as Polity Contestation. European Journal of Social Theory 15 (4): 537–554.Google Scholar
  10. De Winter, L., and M. Gómez-Reino Cachafeiro. 2002. European Integration and Ethnoregionalist Parties. Party Politics 8 (4): 483–503.Google Scholar
  11. De Winter, L., and H. Türsan, eds. 1998. Regionalist Parties in Western Europe. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  12. Elias, A. 2008. Introduction: Whatever Happened to the Europe of the Regions? Revisiting the Regional Dimension of European Politics. Regional & Federal Studies 18 (5): 483–492.Google Scholar
  13. Erk, J. 2010. Is Nationalism Left or Right? Critical Junctures in Quebecois Nationalism. Nations and Nationalism 16 (3): 423–441.Google Scholar
  14. Frampton, M. 2005. Sinn Féin and the European Arena ‘Ourselves Alone or ‘Critical Engagement? Irish Studies in International Affairs 16 (1): 235–253.Google Scholar
  15. Gómez-Reino, M. 2014. European Integration and An Alternative Party Family: Regionalist Parties and the European Question. In Europe’s Contending Identities: Supranationalism, Ethnoregionalism, Religion and New Nationalism, ed. Andrew C. Gould and Anthony M. Messina. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  16. Harvie. 1994. The Rise of Regional Europe. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  17. Hayward, K., and M. Murphy. 2013. The Europeanization of Party Politics in Ireland: North and South. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  18. Hechter, M. 1999. Internal Colonialism. The Celtic Fringe in British National Development. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  19. Hepburn, E. 2008. The Rise and Fall of a ‘Europe of the Regions’. Regional & Federal Studies 18 (5): 537–555.Google Scholar
  20. ———. 2009a. Regionalist Party Mobilisation on Immigration. West European Politics 32 (3): 514–535.Google Scholar
  21. ———. 2009b. Reconceptualizing Substate Mobilization. Regional and Federal Studies 19 (4–5): 477–499.Google Scholar
  22. ———. 2010. Using Europe. Territorial Party Strategies in a Multilevel System. Manchester: Manchester University Press.Google Scholar
  23. Hetcher, M. 1999. Internal Colonialism. The Celtic Fringe in British National Development (1536–1966). Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  24. Hix, S., and P. Lord. 1997. Political Parties in the European Union. London: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  25. Hix, S., and M. Marsh. 2011. Second-Order Effects Plus Pan-European Political Swings: An Analysis of European Parliament Elections Across Time. Electoral Studies 30: 4–15.Google Scholar
  26. Hix, S., and M. Marx. 2007. Punishment or Protest? Understanding European Parliament Elections. The Journal of Politics 69 (2): 495–510.Google Scholar
  27. Hooghe, L., and G. Marks. 2009. A Postfunctional Theory of European Integration: From Permissive Consensus to Constraining Dissensus. British Journal of Political Science 39 (1): 1–23.Google Scholar
  28. Hooghe, Lisbeth, Gary Marks, and Carole Wilson. 2004. Does Left/Right Structure Party Positions on European Integration? In European Integration and Political Conflict, ed. Gary Marks and Marco R. Steenbergen. Cambridge: Cambridge University.Google Scholar
  29. Jolly, S. 2007. The Europhile Fringe? Regionalist Party Support for European Integration. European Union Politics 8 (1): 109–130.Google Scholar
  30. ———. 2014. Strange Bedfellows: Public Support for the EU Among Regionalists. In Europe’s Contending Identities. Supranationalism, Ethnoregionalism, Religion and New Nationalism, ed. A. Gould and A. Messina. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  31. Keating, M., and L. Hooghe. 2006. Bypassing the Nation-State: Regions and the EU Process. In European Union: Power and Policy Making, ed. J. Richardson. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  32. Kopecký, P., and C. Mudde. 2002. The Two Sides of Euroscepticism. Party Positions on European Integration in East Central Europe. European Union Politics 3 (3): 297–326.Google Scholar
  33. Kriesi, H., et al. 2016. Globalization and the Transformation of the National Political Space: Six European Countries Compared. European Journal of Political Research 45 (6): 921–956.Google Scholar
  34. Mair, P. 2000. The Limited Impact of Europe on National Party Systems. West European Politics 23 (4): 27–51.Google Scholar
  35. Marks, G., and M. Steenbergen, eds. 2004. European Integration and Political Conflict. New York: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  36. Marks, G., and C. Wilson. 2000. The Past in the Present: A Cleavage Theory of Party Positions on European Integration. British Journal of Political Science 30 (3): 433–459.Google Scholar
  37. Marks, G., C. Wilson, and L. Ray. 2002. National Political Parties and European Integration. American Journal of Political Science 46 (3): 585–593.Google Scholar
  38. Marsh, M. 1998. Testing the Second-Order Election Model After Four European Elections. British Journal of Political Science 28 (4): 591–607.Google Scholar
  39. Massetti, E. 2009. Explaining Regionalist Party Positioning in a Multi-Dimensional Ideological Space: A Framework for Analysis. Regional and Federal Studies 19 (4–5): 501–531.Google Scholar
  40. Massetti, E., and A.H. Schakel. 2015. From Class to Region: How Regionalist Parties Link (and Subsume) Left-Right into Centre-Periphery Politics. Party Politics 21 (6): 866–886.Google Scholar
  41. Mees, L. 2015a. The Basque Nationalist Party and the Challenge of Sovereignty 1998–2014. In Contesting Spain? The Dynamics of Nationalist Movements in Catalonia and the Basque country, ed. R. Gillepsie and C. Gray. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  42. ———. 2015b. Nationalist Politics at the Crossroads: The Basque Nationalist Party and the Challenge of Sovereignty (1998–2014). Nationalism and Ethnic Politics 21: 44–62.Google Scholar
  43. Meguid, B. 2005. Strategy in Niche Party Success. American Political Science Review 99 (3): 347–359.Google Scholar
  44. ———. 2008. Party Competition Among Unequals: The Role of Mainstream Party parties in Niche party success. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  45. ———. 2014. Institutional Change and Ethnoterritorial Party Representation. In Europe Contending’s Identities, ed. A.C. Gould and A.M. Messina. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  46. Meyer, T., and B. Miller. 2015. The Niche Party Concept and Its Measurement. Party Politics 21 (2): 259–271.Google Scholar
  47. Mudde, C. 2012. Three Decades of Populist Radical Right Parties in Europe. So What? European Journal of Political Research 52 (1): 1–19. The Stein Rokkan Lecture.Google Scholar
  48. Quaglia, L. 2003. Euroscepticism in Italy and Centre-Right and Right Wing Political Parties, SEI Working Papers (60).Google Scholar
  49. Raunio, T. 2006. The Svenska Folkpartiet: The Gradual Decline of a Language Party. In Autonomist Parties in Europe: Identity Politics and the Revival of the Territorial Cleavage, ed. Lieven De Winter, Marga Gómez-Reino, and Peter Lynch, 123–139. Barcelona: ICPS.Google Scholar
  50. Ray, L. 1999. Measuring Party Orientations Towards European Integration. European Journal of Political Research 36 (2): 283–306.Google Scholar
  51. Reif, K., and H. Schmitt. 1980. Nine Second-Order National Elections: A Conceptual Framework for the Analysis of European Elections. European Journal of Political Research 8: 3–44.Google Scholar
  52. Ruffin, F. 2014. Pauvres actionnaires ! : Quarante ans de discours économique du Front national passés au crible. Amiens: Fakir Editions.Google Scholar
  53. Schakel, A. 2013. Congruence Between Regional and National Elections. Comparative Political Studies 46 (5): 631–662.Google Scholar
  54. Schmitt, H., and I. Tüygur. 2016. European Parliament Elections of May 2014: Driven by National Politics or EU Policy Making? Politics and Governance 4 (1): 167–181.Google Scholar
  55. Schori Liang, C. 2007. Europe for the Europeans: The Foreign and Security Policy of the Populist Radical Right. Farnham: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  56. Steenbergen, M., and D. Scott. 2004. Contesting Europe. The Salience of European Integration as a Party Issue. In European Integration and Political Conflict, ed. G. Marks and M. Steenbergen. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  57. Urwin, D. 1983. Harbinger, Fossil or Fleabite. In West European Party Systems. Continuity and Change, ed. P. Mair. Beverly Hills: Sage Publications.Google Scholar
  58. Van Morgan, S. 2006. Plaid Cymru – The Party of Wales: The New Politics of Welsh Nationalism at the Dawn of the 21st Century. In Autonomist Parties in Europe: Identity Politics and the Revival of the Territorial Cleavage, ed. L. De Winter, M. Gómez-Reino, and P. Lynch. Barcelona: ICPS.Google Scholar
  59. Wagner, M. 2012. Defining and Measuring Niche Parties. Party Politics 18 (6): 845–864.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Margarita Gómez-Reino
    • 1
  1. 1.Universidad Nacional de Educación a DistMadridSpain

Personalised recommendations