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Afterword: Giving Life—Black Women’s Liberatory Praxis

  • Helen A. Neville
Chapter

Abstract

Black Women’s Liberatory Pedagogies is to the millennial generation what texts like But Some of Us are Brave (Hull, G. T., Scott, P. B., & Smith, B., All the women are white, all the blacks are men, but some of us are brave: Black women’s studies. Feminist Press, 1982) and Ain’t I a Woman (Hooks, B., Ain’t I a woman: Black women and feminism. South End Press, 1981) were to older generations of Black women. I identify the core themes weaved throughout the chapter, including Black women finding voice to identify and name their race-gender-class-sexual orientation experiences, resisting hegemonic expectations, embracing resistance pedagogy and praxis, and teaching to heal. I end by challenging the reader to build on this work and enact transformative practices in the classroom and community.

References

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Helen A. Neville
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Educational Psychology and African American StudiesUniversity of Illinois at Urbana–ChampaignChampaignUSA

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