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Managing the Dual Identity: Practitioner and Researcher

  • Anne Arber
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter discusses what it means to have a dual identity as a practitioner and researcher. Keeping a marginal positioning on the boundary between the practitioner and researcher identities is not easy. Enhancing credibility through methods of reflexive accounting is important when using qualitative methods. The lived experience of fieldwork will be explored, to discuss insider and outsider identity management and how identity crises may be resolved. Reflexive practice is about recognising who we are and how we are part of the worlds we study; this will be explored alongside the tensions involved in managing a research relationship rather than a therapeutic relationship.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anne Arber
    • 1
  1. 1.University of SurreyGuildfordUK

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