Advertisement

Educational Perspectives

  • Vanessa Rawlings
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter endeavours to provide an insight into the underlying themes, core legislation requirements, curriculum frameworks, and education practices and provisions that focus on meeting the needs of children and young people with special educational needs and/or disabilities (SEND). The discussions within outline key themes and underpinning theoretical perspectives that have, and continue to influence, educational policy within education in the United Kingdom. The chapter begins by identifying key terms used within educational establishments and considers how they are applied and (mis)understood. A brief discussion of historical issues follows on from this and then contemporary educational approaches and perspectives on special educational needs (SEN) are examined. This chapter aims to offer a critical understanding of best practices that underpin the delivery, monitoring and assessment for short-term educational intervention strategies.

References

  1. Academies Act. (2010). Chapter 32. London: HMSO. Retrieved November 30, 2016, from http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2010/32/section/1
  2. Allan, J., Smyth, G., L’Anson, J., & Jane Mott, J. (2009). Understanding disability with children’s social capital. Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, 9(2), 115–121.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Apple, M. W. (2013). Can education change society? New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  4. Apple, M. W. (2016). Introduction to “The politics of educational reforms”. The Educational Forum, 80(2), 127–136.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Association of Teachers and Lecturers (ATL). (2016). Press release: Lack of funding means SEND pupils aren’t adequately supported. Retrieved April 20, 2017, from https://www.atl.org.uk/latest/press-release/lack-funding-means-send-pupils-arent-adequately-supported-atl
  6. Barnes, C., & Mercer, G. (2010). Exploring disability (2nd ed.). Cambridge: Polity Press.Google Scholar
  7. Barton, L. (2012). Response. In M. Arnot (Ed.), The sociology of disability and inclusive education: A tribute to Len Barton (pp. 114–122). London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  8. BBC. (2016). Cash shortage for special educational needs’ support. Retrieved April 10, 2017, from http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-36425290
  9. Benson, D. (2014). Education (School). In C. Cameron (Ed.), Disability studies: A pupil guide. London: Sage Publications.Google Scholar
  10. Biggeri, M., Ballet, J., & Comim, F. (2011). Children and the capability approach. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Bourdieu, P. (1986). The forms of capital. In J. G. Richardson (Ed.), Handbook of theory and research for the sociology of education. New York: Greenwood Press.Google Scholar
  12. Bronfenbrenner, U. (2005). Making human beings human: Bioecological perspectives on human development. London: Sage Publications.Google Scholar
  13. Brooks, V., Abbott, I., & Huddlestone, P. (2012). Preparing to teach in secondary schools. Maidenhead: OUP.Google Scholar
  14. Callus, A., & Farrugia, R. (2016). The disabled child’s participation rights. Farnham, Surrey: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  15. Cheminais, R. (2015). Handbook for SENCOs (2nd ed.). London: Sage Publications Ltd.Google Scholar
  16. Children and Families Act. (2014). Chapter 6. London: HMSO. Retrieved February 6, 2017, from www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2014/6/pdfs/ukpga_20140006_en.pdf
  17. Davis, J. M. (2011). Integrated children’s services. London: Sage Publications Ltd.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Department for Education. (2010). Progression 2010–11: Advice on improving data to raise attainment and maximise the progress of learners with special educational needs. London: Department for Education.Google Scholar
  19. Department for Education (DfE). (2014a). Statutory guidance: National curriculum in England: Framework for key stages 1 to 4. Retrieved August 1, 2016, from https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-curriculum-in-england-framework-for-key-stages-1-to-4/the-national-curriculum-in-england-framework-for-key-stages-1-to-4
  20. Department for Education (DfE). (2014b). Schools guide to the 0 to 25 SEND code of practice. Advice for schools governing bodies, senior leadership teams, SENCOs and classroom staff. Retrieved January 2, 2017, from https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/send-guide-for-schools-and-alternative-provision-settings
  21. Department for Education (DfE). (2015). Carter review of initial teacher training. Retrieved April 2, 2017, from https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/carter-review-of-initial-teacher-training
  22. Department for Education and Department for Health (DfE and DoH). (2014). Special educational needs and disability code of practice: 0 to 25 years. Statutory guidance for organisations which work with and support children and young people who have special educational needs or disabilities. Retrieved November 30, 2016, from https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/send-code-of-practice-0-to-25
  23. Devecchi, C. (2014). Glossary. In L. Florian (Ed.), The Sage handbook of special education (Vol. 2, 2nd ed.). London: Sage Publications.Google Scholar
  24. Donovan, J., Henderson, D., James, P., & Martin-Denham, S. (2015a). Planning for learning. In S. Martin-Denham (Ed.), Teaching children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities. London: Sage Publications Ltd.Google Scholar
  25. Donovan, J., Henderson, D., James, P., & Martin-Denham, S. (2015b). Assessing learning. In S. Martin-Denham (Ed.), Teaching children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities. London: Sage Publications Ltd.Google Scholar
  26. Education Act. (2002). Chapter 32. London: HMSO. Retrieved November 30, 2016, from http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2002/32/section/78
  27. EHRC. (2017). Being disabled in Britain: A journey less equal. Retrieved April 10, 2017, from https://www.equalityhumanrights.com/en/publication-download/being-disabled-britain-journey-less-equal
  28. Ekins, A. (2013). The changing face of educational needs: Impact and implications for SENCOs, teachers and their schools (2nd ed.). Abingdon: Routledge.Google Scholar
  29. Elvidge, K. (2013). Inclusion. In K. Taylor & R. Woolley (Eds.), Values and vision in primary education. Maidenhead: OUP.Google Scholar
  30. Equality Act. (2010). Chapter 15. London: HMSO. Retrieved November 30, 2016, from http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2010/15/contents
  31. Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC). (2017). Being disabled in Britain: A journey less equal. Retrieved April 11, 2017, from https://www.equalityhumanrights.com/en/publication-download/being-disabled-britain-journey-less-equal
  32. European Agency for Development in Special Needs Education (EADSNE). (2010). Teacher education for inclusion: International literature review. Retrieved November 30, 2016, from https://www.european-agency.org/sites/default/files/TE4I-Literature-Review.pdf
  33. European Agency for Development in Special Needs Education (EADSNE). (2012). Profile of inclusive teachers. Retrieved January 2, 2017, from http://www.european-agency.org/agency-projects/Teacher-Education-for-Inclusion/profile
  34. Farrell, M. (2017). Educating special students: An introduction to provision for learners with disabilities and disorders (3rd ed.). Abingdon: Routledge.Google Scholar
  35. Florian, L. (2014). Reimagining special education: Why new approaches are needed. In L. Florian (Ed.), The Sage handbook of special education (Vol. 1, 2nd ed.). London: Sage Publications Ltd.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Frederickson, N., & Cline, T. (2015). Special educational needs, inclusion and diversity (3rd ed.). Maidenhead: Open University Press.Google Scholar
  37. Goodley, D. (2017). Disability studies: An interdisciplinary introduction. London: Sage Publications Ltd.Google Scholar
  38. Gorad, S., & Smith, E. (2010). Equity in education. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Hodkinson, A. (2016). Key issues in special educational needs and inclusion. London: Sage Publications Ltd.Google Scholar
  40. Hornby, G. (2014). Inclusive special education: Evidence-Based practices for children with special needs and disabilities. London: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Lindsay, G., Dockrell, J., Law, J., Roulstone, S., & Vignoles, A. (2010). Better communication research programme: 1st interim report. Research Report DFE-RR070. Retrieved January 15, 2017, from https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/...data/.../DFE-RR070.pdf
  42. LocalGov. (2017). Gov announces millions in extra funding for SEND provision. Retrieved March 10, 2017, from https://www.localgov.co.uk/Gov-announces-millions-in-extra-funding-for-SEND-provision-/42679
  43. Long, R. (2016). House of Commons Briefing Paper Number 07020, 10 November 2016. Special Educational Needs: Support in England. Retrieved January 15, 2017, from http://researchbriefings.parliament.uk/ResearchBriefing/Summary/SN07020
  44. Mintz, J., Mulholland, M., & Peacey, N. (2015). Towards a new reality for teacher education for SEND – DfE SEND in ITT project report and roadmap for SEND. London: UCL Institute of Education.Google Scholar
  45. Nasen. (2016a). Intent to include a focus on SEN within initial teacher training. Retrieved April 2, 2017, from http://www.nasen.org.uk/newsviews/newsviews.intent-to-include-a-focus-on-sen-within-initial-teacher-training.html
  46. Nasen. (2016b). Free SEND training for all practitioners. Retrieved April 2, 2017, from http://www.nasen.org.uk/newsviews/newsviews.free-send-training-for-all-practitioners.html
  47. Nes, C. (2014). The professional knowledge of inclusive special educators. In L. Florian (Ed.), The Sage handbook of special education (Vol. 2, 2nd ed.). London: Sage Publications Ltd.Google Scholar
  48. Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR). (2016). General comment on the right to inclusive education. Retrieved November 30, 2016, from http://www.ohchr.org/EN/HRBodies/CRPD/Pages/GCRightEducation.aspx
  49. Ofsted. (2014). Subsidiary guidance: Supporting the inspection of maintained schools and academies from January 2014. Manchester: Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills.Google Scholar
  50. Ofsted. (2016). School inspection handbook: Handbook for inspecting schools in England under section 5 of the Education Act 2005. Manchester: Ofsted.Google Scholar
  51. OFSTED and CQC. (2016). Local area SEND inspection outcome letters. Retrieved April 18, 2017, from https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/local-area-send-inspection-outcome-letters
  52. Oliver, M. (1996). Understanding disability: From theory to practice. Basingstoke: Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  53. Pollard, A. (2008). Reflective teaching (3rd ed.). London: Continuum International Publishing Group.Google Scholar
  54. Qvortrup, J. (1994). Childhood matters: An introduction. In J. Qvortrup, M. Bardy, G. Sgritta, & H. Wintersberger (Eds.), Childhood matters: Social theory, practice and politics. Aldershot: Avebury.Google Scholar
  55. Reiser, R. (2012). Inclusive education. In M. Cole (Ed.), Education equality and human rights. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  56. Rioux, M. (2014). Disability rights in education. In L. Florian (Ed.), The Sage handbook of special education (Vol. 1, 2nd ed.). London: Sage Publications Ltd.Google Scholar
  57. Shakespeare, T. (2014). Critical realist approaches to disability. In Disability rights and wrongs revisited (2nd ed.). London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  58. Simon, C. A. (2017). Beyond every child matters: Neo-liberal education and social policy in the new era. Abingdon: Routledge.Google Scholar
  59. Slee, R. (1996). Disability, social class and poverty: School structures and policing identities. In D. Christensen & F. Rizvi (Eds.), Disability and the dilemmas of education and justice. Buckingham: Open University Press.Google Scholar
  60. Slee, R. (2008). Beyond special and regular schooling? An inclusive education reform agenda. International Studies in Sociology of Education, 18(2), 99–116.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  61. Taylor, K., & Woolley, R. (2013). Values and vision in primary education. Maidenhead: OUP.Google Scholar
  62. Terzi, L. (Ed.). (2010). Special educational needs: A new look. London: Continuum International Publishing Group.Google Scholar
  63. The Guardian. (2016). Ministers have failed to explain where schools will find savings, watchdog says. Retrieved April 30, 2017, from https://www.theguardian.com/education/2016/dec/14/ministers-have-failed-to-explain-where-schools-will-find-savings-watchdog-says
  64. The Guardian. (2017). Cuts, cuts, cuts. Headteachers tell of school system ‘that could implode’. Retrieved April 30, 2017, from https://www.theguardian.com/education/2017/jan/17/cuts-headteachers-schools-funding-crisis
  65. UN. (2008). Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Geneva: OHCRC.Google Scholar
  66. UNESCO. (1994). The Salamanca statement and framework for action on special needs education. Paris: UNESCO.Google Scholar
  67. UNESCO. (2005). Guidelines for inclusion: Ensuring access to education for all. Retrieved February 10, 2017, from http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0014/001402/140224e.pdf
  68. Unicef. (2004). Convention on the rights of the child 1989. London: Unicef UK.Google Scholar
  69. Vygotsky, L. (1978). Mind in society: The development of higher psychological processes. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  70. Warnock, M. (1978). Special education needs report of the committee of enquiry into the education of handicapped children and young people (Warnock Report). London: HMSO.Google Scholar
  71. Warnock, M. (2006). Introduction. In M. Farrell (Ed.), Celebrating the special school. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  72. World Health Organisation (WHO). (2011). World report on disability. Retrieved January 10, 2016, from www.who.int/disabilities/world_report/2011/report.pdf

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vanessa Rawlings
    • 1
  1. 1.University of SuffolkIpswichUK

Personalised recommendations