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Early Interventions

  • Garfield Hunt
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter critically explores key debates in relation to ‘early intervention’ and questions why we intervene in the lives of children and families living with disability. The chapter engages with historical perspectives on intervention and goes on to explore their development from individually targeted services to the contemporary emphasis on partnership between children, families and professionals. Ecological models provide a lens through which the complexity and diversity of family lives can be explored, especially when planning the delivery of family focused intervention. Intervention from a multiplicity of professionals and services into the everyday lives of children and families living with disability is therefore positioned in the context of ‘negotiation’ in order to bring about self-advocacy and empowerment. Equality and disabled children’s rights from a historical and modern perspective will form the backdrop of the chapter, as both perspectives are intertwined and have had major influences on how children, and disabled children in particular, are viewed in the twenty-first century in the UK.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Garfield Hunt
    • 1
  1. 1.University of SuffolkIpswichUK

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