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Beyond the ‘Neo-liberal Penality Thesis’? Punitive Turn and Political Change in South America

  • Máximo Sozzo
Chapter

Abstract

In recent years it has emerged in the Global North a narrative about the punitive turn in the penal field that explains its development in certain national scenarios as United States and England and Wales as a result of the spread of neo-liberalism as a political project over the past four decades. This narrative has been extended to think about the emergence of evident trends toward the increase of punitiveness present in penal policies in other contexts and regions. This narrative is now under heavy criticism from various points of view, discussing their applicability to the scenarios of the Global North. This chapter intends to add other perspectives to this discussion using evidence arising from a comparative exploration of South America. In this sense, the chapter aims more generally to contribute to a dialogue between criminological productions generated in the Global North and South, in an opposite direction to the one that has traditionally been dominant in this field of knowledge.

Keywords

Southern penalities Latin America Criminological theory Neo-liberalism 

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© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Máximo Sozzo
    • 1
  1. 1.National University of Litoral Santa FeSanta FeArgentina

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