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Capturing Crime in the Antipodes: Colonist Cultural Representation of Indigeneity

  • Bridget Harris
  • Jenny Wise
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter adopts a Southern criminological lens, which allows the authors to explore how colonialism has been constructed and depicted in museums within both regional and urban Australia. By studying spatial and historical silences in Australian museums, this chapter offers a consistent frame to chronologically chart Anglo-Australian depictions of Indigeneity, imperialism and violence wielded by the state. As this chapter will argue, museums can often reflect Westernized (white) conceptualizations about Indigeneity and the state violence involved in colonization, which actively re-enforces popular views and influences sociopolitical visions of identity, the state and justice.

Keywords

Colonialism Aboriginality Indigeneity Museums State crime 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bridget Harris
    • 1
  • Jenny Wise
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Justice, Faculty of LawQueensland University of TechnologyBrisbaneAustralia
  2. 2.School of Behavioural, Cognitive and Social SciencesUniversity of New EnglandArmidaleAustralia

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