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Commentary: Poesis and Imagination

  • Tania Zittoun
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Creativity and Culture book series (PASCC)

Abstract

This chapter proposes a sociocultural psychological perspective on poesis, highlighting and integrating the contributions of Argüello Manresa and Glăveanu, Lordelo, Valsiner and Watzlawik (all in this volume). First, the chapter attempts to define “poesis” as a broad phenomenon. Second, it invites to focus on psychological experiences and their social and cultural nature. Three theoretical points are examined: first, the “poetic chain”, by which cultural elements circulate among people and sociocultural settings to enable poetic experiences; second, the personal poetic experience itself, as a specific type of guided, emotionally laden imagination; and third, the outcomes of poesis—and especially, its fundamental subversive power. The chapter finally considers the methodological implications of these arguments.

Notes

Acknowledgment

I thank Constance de Saint-Laurent for her useful feedback on a first version of this commentary and the editors for their support.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tania Zittoun
    • 1
  1. 1.University of NeuchâtelNeuchâtelSwitzerland

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