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Intelligent Planning Methods and Features of Their Usage for Development Automation of Dynamic Integrated Expert Systems

  • Galina V. Rybina
  • Yuri M. Blokhin
  • Sergey S. Parondzhanov
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 636)

Abstract

The problems of intellectualization in the development process of dynamic integrated expert systems basing on the problem-oriented methodology and the AT-TECHNOLOGY workbench are considered. The experience from carrying out intellectual planning development plan generating of prototypes in integrated expert systems, the intelligent planner usage, reusable components, typical project procedures, and other components of the intellectual software environment in the AT-TECHNOLOGY workbench is described.

Notes

Acknowledgements

The work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research support (project No. 15-01-04696) and the Competitiveness Program of NRNU “MEPhI” (M.H.U.).

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Galina V. Rybina
    • 1
  • Yuri M. Blokhin
    • 1
  • Sergey S. Parondzhanov
    • 1
  1. 1.National Research Nuclear University MEPhIMoscowRussia

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