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The Historical Evolution of Sex Offender Risk Management

  • Hazel Kemshall
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Risk, Crime and Society book series (PSRCS)

Abstract

Since the early 1990s, a raft of legislation and policies in respect of sexual offender risk management has been enacted predominantly by the USA, with Canada and the UK adopting similar responses. These developments have often occurred in response to child deaths or abductions, and have largely taken a preventive and regulatory stance, resulting in an approach labelled as ‘community protection’. This chapter will review the key trends in legislative and policy responses to managing sex offenders within the community, concluding with a consideration of alternative possibilities and emerging alternative responses to sex offender community management. The latter include attempts to reintegrate sexual offenders more effectively and safely into the community, and attempts to engage communities more effectively in achieving public safety.

Keywords

Sex offending Historical developments ‘Discovery’ 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hazel Kemshall
    • 1
  1. 1.Community and Criminal JusticeDe Montfort UniversityLeicesterUK

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