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Multiliteracies Pedagogy and Heritage Language Teacher Education: A Model for Professional Development

  • Manel Lacorte
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter introduces a model of professional development for pre- and in-service instructors of heritage language learners based on a combination of (a) key linguistic, cultural, and social concepts and skills; (b) a sociocultural theoretical perspective that puts emphasis on creating opportunities for teachers to move toward more theoretically and pedagogically sound practices; and (c) a multiliteracies approach focused on the expansion of learnersʼ resources for making meaning through multiple modes of language use. Our model aims to develop in-depth understanding of instructors’ concrete practical experiences as learners of language in academic environments and/or in the everyday world; of the research and pedagogical principles generated in a range of academic and professional areas; and of social, cultural, and ideological issues related to heritage language education.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Manel Lacorte
    • 1
  1. 1.University of MarylandCollege ParkUSA

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