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Designing a Comprehensive Curriculum for Advanced Spanish Heritage Learners: Contributions from the Multiliteracies Framework

  • María Luisa Parra
  • Araceli Otero
  • Rosa Flores
  • Marguerite Lavallée
Chapter

Abstract

This case study describes the curriculum design and results of an advanced college-level course for Spanish heritage students based on the tenets of Learning by Design. The goal of this class was to strengthen students’ oral and written Spanish skills and to develop their socio-cultural and linguistic awareness. Seven students participated in the study. Data were based on the participants’ initial and final self-evaluations, the tracking of their reading progress, their multimodal art projects, and their written reflections on the meaning of Spanish in their lives. The results showed the benefits of the framework used for the strengthening of heritage learners’ Spanish as well as for their personal growth and reaffirmation of their ethnolinguistic identity.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • María Luisa Parra
    • 1
  • Araceli Otero
    • 2
  • Rosa Flores
    • 2
  • Marguerite Lavallée
    • 3
  1. 1.Harvard UniversityCambridgeUSA
  2. 2.Universidad Nacional Autónoma de MéxicoMexico CityMexico
  3. 3.Laval UniversityQuébecCanada

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