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Selecting Social Change Leaders

  • Everlyn Anyal Musa-Oito
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter reviews several scholarship programs that provide access to higher education as a means to strengthen leaders from marginalized communities. First, the chapter examines the strategies employed for goal setting, target group identification, and recruitment. Second, the chapter analyzes the role of effective and efficient outreach processes in informing and attracting candidates from targeted groups and reaffirming candidates’ confidence in the credibility and value of the scholarship opportunity. Best practices for selecting future social change leaders are summarized. Beyond selection, the chapter describes the comprehensive programmatic support required to overcome barriers faced by nontraditional students in higher education settings.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Everlyn Anyal Musa-Oito
    • 1
  1. 1.United States International University Africa (USIU-Africa)NairobiKenya

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