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Global Migration of Talent: Drain, Gain, and Transnational Impacts

  • Robin R. Marsh
  • Ruth Uwaifo Oyelere
Chapter

Abstract

According to United Nations data, the number of international migrants worldwide reached 244 million in 2015. Among these migrants, recent data suggest a steeply increasing trend in the proportion of highly skilled emigration to total emigration, including international student mobility. In this chapter, we review the ‘brain drain’ debate and present relevant data on ‘talent mobility’ within the context of globalization and knowledge-based economies. We also discuss the main winners and losers from talent mobility and present examples of policies and programs employed by source countries to incentivize return. Finally, we conclude by developing a set of policy implications for mitigating ‘brain drain’ and capitalizing on the growing potential of diaspora and transnational communities to stimulate economic development and social change in their countries of origin.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robin R. Marsh
    • 1
  • Ruth Uwaifo Oyelere
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute for the Study of Societal IssuesUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA
  2. 2.Morehouse CollegeAtlantaGeorgia

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