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Charter of Global Ethic in Minimal English

  • Anna Wierzbicka
Chapter

Abstract

Taking UNESCO’s (The Earth Charter, 2000) “Earth Charter” as its point of departure, this chapter argues that the globalizing world needs a global ethics. At the same time, the chapter builds on the “Declaration Toward a Global Ethic” (1993) endorsed by the Parliament of the World’s Religions (and inspired by the Dalai Lama) whose Principle 6 reads: “This must be a Declaration translatable into other languages”. A charter of 24 ethical norms phrased in Minimal English is proposed as a platform for a global discourse on ethics.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anna Wierzbicka
    • 1
  1. 1.Australian National UniversityCanberraAustralia

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