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Translating Arab Women Academics: The Case of Olfa Youssef’s Ḥayratu Muslimah

  • Lamia Benyoussef
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Translating and Interpreting book series (PTTI)

Abstract

Combining the insight of Else Ribeiro Pires Vieira’s poetics of transcreation; Susan Bassnett and André Lefevere’s rapprochement between cultural studies, translation studies, and globalization; and Mona Baker’s recent scholarship on translating dissent in the Egyptian Revolution, this chapter examines not only the translator’s double role as translator and transcreator of Olfa Youssef’s original reading of the Qur’an from Arabic into English, but also the various challenges the author encountered while trying to introduce into the Anglophone world this Tunisian scholar’s groundbreaking work Ḥayratu Muslimah (Perplexity of a Muslim Woman). This chapter’s main thesis is that translation from Arabic into English is a patriarchal enterprise, and any attempt to translate beyond the parameters of that hom(m)osexual exchange is a subversive act of political intervention.

Keywords

Transcreator Translating dissent Language and politics Arab women academics 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lamia Benyoussef
    • 1
  1. 1.Birmingham-Southern CollegeBirminghamUSA

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