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Removal of Phthalate Esters by Combination of Activated Carbon with Nanofiltration

  • Long Wang
  • Qiaoling Wan
  • Junjie Wu
  • Ming Guo
  • Shuang Mao
  • Jiaqi Lin
Conference paper
Part of the Environmental Earth Sciences book series (EESCI)

Abstract

Nanofiltration (NF), combined with activated carbon (AC) for phthalate esters (PAEs) treatment, were studied. Three kinds of typical PAEs dimethyl phthalate (DMP), di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and dioctyl phthalate (DOP) were selected as target contaminant. Fifty µg/L of each PAEs liquid match was prepared with natural river water and treated by NF combined with 10 mg/L or 50 mg/L powdered AC. The test was processed at normal temperature, 0.4 MPa pressure, and pH value as 7. The results indicated that AC can be used as the pretreatment of NF to remove the majority of dissolved organic matter and inorganic particles and can be a safeguard for NF membrane. The removal rates of three PAEs by AC-NF were all above 99%, which suggests that the AC-NF process is feasible for PAEs treatment.

Keywords

Removal Phthalate esters Activated carbon Nanofiltration 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Long Wang
    • 1
  • Qiaoling Wan
    • 2
  • Junjie Wu
    • 3
  • Ming Guo
    • 3
  • Shuang Mao
    • 1
  • Jiaqi Lin
    • 3
  1. 1.Chongqing Academy of Metrology and Quality InspectionChongqingChina
  2. 2.Chongqing Monitoring Station, Water Quality Monitoring Network of National Urban Water SupplyChongqingChina
  3. 3.Hebei University of EngineeringHandanChina

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