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Vulvar Disease pp 315-318 | Cite as

Vulvar Erosions: Excoriations, Erosive Lichen Planus, and Fissures

  • Veronika Suzuki
  • Veronica Maldonado
  • Silvio Tatti
Chapter

Abstract

Erosions, ulcers, excoriations, and fissures are among the secondary morphology presentations in the IFCPC clinical terminology of the vulva. Lichen planus (LP) is a chronic inflammatory mucocutaneous disease of unknown etiology. Patients present with vaginal discharge, soreness, burning, itching, pain, or bleeding with sexual intercourse. Treatment often consists of topical immunosuppressive therapy and vaginal dilators to break adhesions. Vulvar fissures are also discussed.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Veronika Suzuki
    • 1
  • Veronica Maldonado
    • 1
  • Silvio Tatti
    • 1
  1. 1.Hospital de Clinicas “Jose de San Martin”, University of Buenos AiresBuenos AiresArgentina

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