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Elite Education and Internationalisation—From the Early Years into Higher Education. An Introduction

  • Ulrike Deppe
  • Claire Maxwell
  • Heinz-Hermann Krüger
  • Werner Helsper
Chapter

Abstract

Processes of internationalisation are increasingly recognised as central to the study of education. Most of the research emphasises the importance of global education policy initiatives and forms of accountability, the exponential growth of edu-businesses, the increasing transnational movement of capital and people, and how this has led to increased international patterns of mobility for education. Meanwhile, research and theorisation around elite education has experienced a resurgence in recent years. Increasingly, this latter work takes up the importance of internationalisation in shaping what constitutes an elite education—what is sought after in terms of an education and aspired to in terms of future destinations.This introduction chapter provides a brief overview of the key literature on internationalisation and elite education, and sketches out the research agenda this edited collection seeks to engage with. Critically, we focus on how uneven patterns of influence of internationalisation appear to be across different national contexts, as well as across the various phases of education. We argue that taking a focus across education phases is central to understanding how elite education is inter-linked and shapes access into elite positions later on in life. The chapter also offers a clarification of the key terms and theoretical concepts drawn on when discussing internationalisation practices within education, and the different theoretical influences relevant to such examinations. Finally, we provide an overview of the contributions in this edited volume.

Keywords

introduction internationalisation elite education elite formation institutional patterns 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ulrike Deppe
    • 1
  • Claire Maxwell
    • 2
  • Heinz-Hermann Krüger
    • 3
  • Werner Helsper
    • 4
  1. 1.Zentrum für Schul- und BildungsforschungMartin-Luther-Universität Halle-WittenbergHalleGermany
  2. 2.UCL Institute of EducationUniversity College LondonLondonUK
  3. 3.Institut für PädagogikMartin-Luther-Universität Halle-WittenbergHalleGermany
  4. 4.Institut für Schulpädagogik und GrundschuldidaktikMartin-Luther-Universität Halle-WittenbergHalleGermany

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