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Spinal Cord Stimulators

  • Vanny LeEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Spinal cord stimulators are increasingly becoming a more prevalent treatment option for patients with chronic pain conditions that are refractory to medical and surgical treatment. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is an effective implantable neuromodulation therapy which is approved for various conditions including failed back and neck pain syndromes, complex regional pain syndrome, peripheral vascular disease, and refractory angina. Because SCS are often placed in women of child-bearing age, there are multiple issues that are of concern in the pregnant patient such as potential teratogenic effects, physical constraints of the SCS device, and complications with neuraxial techniques for labor.

Keywords

Spinal cord stimulator Pregnancy Neuromodulation Chronic pain Neuraxial risks Electromagnetic field 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of AnesthesiologyRutgers-New Jersey Medical SchoolNewarkUSA

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