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Writing Centers in Higher Education Institutions in Qatar: A Critical Review

  • Julian Williams
  • Abdelhamid Ahmed
  • Waheed Adeyimika Bamigbade
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter critically reviews the writing centers (WCs) in ten higher education institutions in Qatar: eight are American/Western branch campuses in Qatar and two are public higher education institutions. It compares the ten WCs in terms of their purpose of establishment and cost of services offered. On the other hand, it contrasts the same centers in terms of their naming, the timing and hours of service, the different venues for booking an appointment and the services offered at each center. The ten WCs are unique in their offered services and show a variety of flexible services aimed at enhancing students’ English writing based on their needs and levels.

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Websites for the Ten Writing Centers in Qatar’s Higher Education Institutions

  1. Carnegie Mellon University: Academic Resource Center. (n.d.) http://webext.qatar.cmu.edu/arc
  2. College of the North Atlantic in Qatar: The Advanced Writing Center (AWC). (n.d.) https://cna.mywconline.com/
  3. Georgetown University School of Foreign Service in Qatar: Office of Academic Services. (n.d.) https://qatar.sfs.georgetown.edu/programs/academic-services
  4. Northwestern University in Qatar: The Writing Center. (n.d.) http://www.qatar.northwestern.edu/education/academic-services/writing-center.html
  5. Qatar University: English Writing Lab (EWL). (n.d.) http://www.qu.edu.qa/students/services/writinglab/writing-labs.php
  6. TEXAS A&M University in Qatar: Academic Success Centers (ASC). (n.d.) http://asc.qatar.tamu.edu/
  7. University of Calgary in Qatar: The Writing Center. (n.d.) http://www.ucalgary.edu.qa/learning-commons/writing-centre/one-on-one
  8. Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) in Qatar School of the Arts: The Writing Center. (n.d.) http://www.qatar.vcu.edu/writingcenter
  9. Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar: The Writing Center. (n.d.) http://qatar-weill.cornell.edu/writing-center/peerconsultation.html

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julian Williams
    • 1
  • Abdelhamid Ahmed
    • 2
  • Waheed Adeyimika Bamigbade
    • 3
  1. 1.Royal Commission Colleges and InstitutesYanbuSaudi Arabia
  2. 2.Core Curriculum ProgramQatar UniversityDohaQatar
  3. 3.Yanbu English Language Institute, Royal CommissionYanbuSaudi Arabia

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