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Changing Girls’ Lives: One Programme at a Time

  • Anja Whittington
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Gender and Education book series (GED)

Abstract

In the past two decades, research conducted on all-female outdoor education/adventure education/experiential education programmes, particularly for adolescent girls, has seen remarkable attention. Many women have focused their careers on creating and offering programmes that promote girls’ development. Researchers and practitioners have documented outcomes of girls’ participation and have shed light on the various benefits that girls may have received. This chapter examines the collective outcomes of girls’ participation in programmes designed for girls, facilitated by women. It examines why all-girls programmes exist, the outcomes and benefits of girls’ participation, and suggests programme-planning strategies for practitioners.

Keywords

Girls’ programmes Outcomes Programme-planning strategies 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anja Whittington
    • 1
  1. 1.Radford UniversityRadfordUSA

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