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From Executive Dominance to Fragmented Authority: An Institutional and Political Analysis

Chapter
Part of the Studies in the Political Economy of Public Policy book series (PEPP)

Abstract

The strained executive-legislative relations for Hong Kong after 1997 originated from an ill-conceived constitutional design which under-specified the role and functions of various institutions. The system was not conducive to building strong executive authority, and created a lot of confusion in executive structure and its relations with legislature. Political changes towards radicalization and governing strategies of C.Y. Leung aggravated the executive-legislative conflicts in 2012–2016. The lack of a clear institutional logic and absence of reforms after 1997 means that the “executive dominant” system, as a hybrid system in a hybrid regime, was unable to deal with the challenge of an elected opposition and an increasingly participative public.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Government and Public AdministrationChinese University of Hong KongHong KongChina

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