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E-Government in Pacific Island Countries

  • Rowena CullenEmail author
  • Graham Hassall
Chapter
Part of the Public Administration and Information Technology book series (PAIT, volume 27)

Abstract

This chapter explains the purpose of the book, which is to examine the state of e-government in the Pacific Islands, and how information and communication technology is changing the practice of government in the region. It outlines the structure and scope of the book, which covers the Pacific Island countries and territories which are members of the Pacific Community, and provides some background for later chapters by describing the dominant cultural groups (Melanesian, Micronesian and Polynesian) and the role of traditional forms of governance in the Pacific. It also describes the characteristics of Pacific small island developing states and how their geographical and economic environment impacts on their development. The role of telecommunications and the development potential of affordable and reliable telecommunications is also outlined. The concept of e-government, how it is appropriately defined in small island developing states and how Pacific Island countries can benefit from e-government is discussed. Their limited resources and dependence on development partners and international investment are also discussed as factors affecting the adoption of e-government. Finally, some conceptual frameworks that have been found useful in exploring e-government in the small island developing states of the Pacific are outlined: Bekkers and Homberg’s ‘information ecology’ approach; Heeks’ ICT4 2.0 Manifesto; and elements of public policy that can usefully be applied. Factors in the ongoing sustainability of e-government projects, including the role of leadership, are identified along with questions and issues that will be raised in the chapters included in the volume and addressed further in the conclusion.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Victoria University of WellingtonWellingtonNew Zealand

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