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History of Acne and Rosacea

  • Gerd Plewig
  • Bodo Melnik
  • WenChieh Chen
Chapter

Abstract

The roots of history were and still are the springs of our current knowledge and concepts in medicine. We owe this veneration to the forefathers of our specialty dermatology. To read, review, and understand their paths of earlier writings and illustrations in books, journals, and dissertations open our eyes to understand the slow but careful delineations of their original concepts. Acne is one of the most common diseases in dermatology. In 1931, Bruno Bloch was the first to point out, after examining some 4000 girls and boys in Zurich, Switzerland, that acne, particularly in the form of comedones, was so frequent in young persons that it could be regarded as a physiological manifestation of puberty. Acne has plagued mankind since antiquity. King Tut (1355–1337 a.d.) had unmistakable acne scars, and his tomb contained a variety of medicaments for treating this disorder.

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    Roentgen Rays and Phototherapy

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    Dermabrasion, Lasers, Punches

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    Research Models

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Rosacea

    History

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    Pathophysiology/Pathogenesis

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    Histopathology

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    Rosacea Fulminans/Pyoderma Faciale

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    Steroid Rosacea

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    Gram-Negative Rosacea

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    Halogen Rosacea/Iodide-Aggravated Rosacea

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    Lupoid Rosacea/Granulomatous Rosacea/Lupus Miliaris Disseminatus Faciei

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    Ocular Rosacea/Ophthalmic Rosacea/Migraine

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    Childhood Rosacea

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    Solid Facial Edema, Morbihan Disease

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    Extrafacial Rosacea

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    Topical Treatment

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Autoinflammatory Syndromes

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Demodex Mites/Demodicosis

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerd Plewig
    • 1
  • Bodo Melnik
    • 2
  • WenChieh Chen
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Dermatology and AllergyLudwig-Maximilian-University MunichMunichGermany
  2. 2.Department of Dermatology, Environmental Medicine and Health TheoryUniversity of OsnabrückOsnabrückGermany
  3. 3.Department of Dermatology and AllergyTechnical University of MunichMunichGermany

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