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Politics Beyond the Water’s Edge: Neoclassical Realism

  • Dean P. Chen
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter explains the theory of neoclassical realism, reviews several notable works, and postulates how the paradigm would enrich our understanding of the Ma Ying-jeou administration’s China policy in the midst of greater USA–China rivalry.

Keywords

Foreign Policy Democratic Progressive Party Outward Foreign Direct Investment Economic Interdependence Grand Strategy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Author’s Interviews

  1. Interview with Robert Sutter, Professor of Practice of International Affairs at the Elliot School of International Affairs, George Washington University, February 24, 2016, Washington, DC, USA.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dean P. Chen
    • 1
  1. 1.Political ScienceRamapo College of New JerseyMahwahUSA

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