Advertisement

Troubling Autoethnography: Critical, Creative, and Deconstructive Approaches to Writing

  • Susanne Gannon
Chapter
Part of the Creativity, Education and the Arts book series (CEA)

Abstract

This chapter explores the parameters of an ‘autoethnography to come’ that might be endlessly expansive, inventive, and creative. Autoethnography is approached as a troubling textual space where writer(s) and reader(s) meet and touch, momentarily, or are repelled, where affect moves and the material things and events of the world bump up against each other in unpredictable ways. The chapter samples six specific experiments in writing risky, relational, provisional subjectivities, and attuning to affective and material modalities.

References

  1. Barthes, R. (1977). Roland Barthes (R. Howard, Trans.). Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  2. Barthes, R. (1978). A lover’s discourse. Fragments (R. Howard, Trans.). London: Penguin.Google Scholar
  3. Bochner, A., & Ellis, C. (2016). Evocative autoethnography: Writing lives and telling stories. New York & Abingdon: Routledge.Google Scholar
  4. Britzman, D. P. (2000). ‘The question of belief’: Writing poststructural ethnography. In E. S. Pierre & W. Pillow (Eds.), Working the ruins: Feminist Poststructural theory and methods in education (pp. 27–40). New York & London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  5. Clough, P. T. (2000). Comments on setting criteria for experimental writing. Qualitative Inquiry, 6(2), 278–291.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Clough, P. T. (2009). The new empiricism: Affect and sociological method. European Journal of Social Theory, 12(1), 43–61.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Clough, P. T. (2010). Praying and playing to the beat of a child’s metronome. Subjectivity, 3(4), 349–365.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Clough, P. T. (2014). A dream of falling. In P. Harvey, E. Casella, G. Evans, H. Knox, C. McLean, E. Silva, N. Thoburn, & K. Woodward (Eds.), Objects and materials: A Routledge companion (pp. 156–161). Abingdon & New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  9. Clough, P. T. (2015). Ecstatic corona: From ethnography to art documentation. Keynote at Summer Institute in Qualitative Inquiry, Manchester Metropolitan University, July. http://www.esri.mmu.ac.uk/siqr/keynotes15/clough15.php
  10. Clough, P. T., & Halley, J. (Eds.). (2007). The affective turn: Theorizing the social. Durham: Duke University Press.Google Scholar
  11. Colebrook, C. (2004). Irony. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  12. Davies, B., & Gannon, S. (Eds.). (2009). Pedagogical encounters. New York: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
  13. Ellis, C. (1997). Evocative autoethnography: Writing emotionally about our lives. In W. G. Tierney & Y. S. Lincoln (Eds.), Representation and the text: Re-framing the narrative voice (pp. 115–142). New York: SUNY Press.Google Scholar
  14. Ellis, C. (2004). The autoethnographic ‘I’: A methodological novel about autoethnography. Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira Press.Google Scholar
  15. Foucault, M. (1984). Of other spaces. (J. Miskowiec, Trans.) Diacritics, 16(1), 22–27.Google Scholar
  16. Foucault, M. (2005). The Hermeneutics of the subject. Lectures at the Collège de France 1981–1982 (G. Burchell, Trans.). New York: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  17. Gale, K., Gallant, M., Gannon, S., Kirkpatrick, D., Malthouse, M., Percy, M., et al. (2013). Inquiring into red/red inquiring. Humanities (Special issue: Art & Words), 2(2), 253–277.Google Scholar
  18. Gannon, S. (2001). (Re)presenting the collective girl: A poetic approach to a methodological dilemma. Qualitative Inquiry, 7(6), 787–800.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Gannon, S. (2002). Picking at the scabs: A poststructuralist/feminist writing project. Qualitative Inquiry., 8(3), 670–682.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Gannon, S. (2006). The (im)possibilities of writing the self: French poststructural theory and autoethnography. Cultural studies ↔ Critical methodologies., 6(4), 474–495.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Gannon, S. (2008). Inhabiting silence: A sorry story. LEARNing Landscapes, 3, 235–244. www.learnquebec.ca/en/content/learninglandscapes/index.html Google Scholar
  22. Gannon, S. (2013). Sketching subjectivities. In S. Holman Jones, T. Adams, & C. Ellis (Eds.), Handbook of autoethnography (pp. 228–243). Walnut Creek, CA: Left Coast Press.Google Scholar
  23. Gannon, S. (2016). Writing the girl: Narratives of place, matter, relations and memory. In I. Goodson, A. Antikainen, P. Sikes, & M. Andrews (Eds.), The Routledge international handbook of narrative and life history (pp. 518–530). London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  24. Gannon, S. (2017). ‘After the humidity and stillness of yesterday…’: Drifting, reading, writing self and others, travelling in otherwhens and otherwheres. Qualitative Inquiry. 23(4), 252–256.Google Scholar
  25. Gannon, S. (2016). Ordinary atmospheres and minor weather events. Departures in Critical Qualitative Research. 5(4), 78–89.Google Scholar
  26. Gannon, S., Walsh, S., Byers, M., & Rajiva, M. (2012). Deterritorializing collective biography. International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, 27(2), 181–195.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Gonick, M., & Gannon, S. (2014). Becoming girl: Collective biography and the production of girlhood. Toronto: The Women’s Press.Google Scholar
  28. Jackson, A., & Mazzei, L. (2008). Experience and ‘I’ in autoethnography. A deconstruction. International Review of Qualitative Research, 1(3), 299–318.Google Scholar
  29. Lather, P. (2000). Drawing the line at angels. In E. S. Pierre & W. Pillow (Eds.), Working the ruins: Feminist poststructural theory and methods in education (pp. 284–311). New York & London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  30. Lather, P., & Smithies, C. (1997). Troubling the angels: Women living with HIV/AIDS. Boulder: Harper Collins Westview.Google Scholar
  31. Seigworth, G., & Gregg, M. (2010). An inventory of shimmers. In M. Gregg & G. Seigworth (Eds.), The affect theory reader (pp. 1–28). Durham: Duke University Press.Google Scholar
  32. Speedy, J. (2015). Staring at the park: A poetic autoethnographic inquiry. Walnut Creek, CA: Left Coast Press.Google Scholar
  33. Stewart, K. (2007). Ordinary affects. Durham: Duke University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Stewart, K. (2010). Afterword: Worlding refrains. In M. Gregg & G. Seigworth (Eds.), The affect theory reader (pp. 339–353). Durham: Duke University Press.Google Scholar
  35. Stewart, K. (2013). An autoethnography of what happens. In S. Holman Jones, T. Adams, & C. Ellis (Eds.), Handbook of autoethnography (pp. 659–668). Walnut Creek, CA: Left Coast Press.Google Scholar
  36. Wyatt, J., Gale, K., Gannon, S., & Davies, B. (2011). Deleuze and collaborative writing: An immanent plane of composition. New York: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
  37. Wyatt, J., Gale, K., Gannon, S., & Davies, B. (2018). Creating a space in between: Collaborative inquiries. In N. Denzin & Y. Lincoln (Eds.), Sage handbook of qualitative research (5th ed.) (pp. 738-756). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susanne Gannon
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Western SydneySydneyAustralia

Personalised recommendations