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Sexually Transmitted Diseases

  • Walter BeldaJr.
Chapter

Abstract

The majority of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) have no symptoms or only mild symptoms that may not be recognized as an STD. The most common conditions they cause are gonorrhea, chlamydial infection, syphilis, trichomoniasis, chancroid, genital herpes, genital warts, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, and hepatitis B infection. Drug resistance is a major threat to reducing the impact of STDs worldwide. When used correctly and consistently, condoms offer one of the most effective methods of protection against STDs, including HIV. Female condoms are effective and safe, but are not used as widely as male condoms by national programs. This chapter presents the main aspects of a major problem for public health. Dermatology can be very important for the management and control of STDs.

Keywords

STD STI Aids HIV Sexual Genital Gonorrhea Chlamydia Syphilis Trichomoniasis Chancroid Herpes Warts HPV 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Livre Docente of Dermatology at Medical School of the Universidade de São Paulo-USPSão PauloBrazil
  2. 2.Livre Docente of Dermatology at Medical School of Universidade Estadual de Campinas – UNICAMPCampinasBrazil
  3. 3.Department of the Medical SchoolUniversidade de São Paulo – USPSão PauloBrazil

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