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Using Renewable Energy to Process Seaweed

  • A. Kamaruddin
  • Aep Saepul Uyun
  • Herman Noer Rahman
  • Eri Suherman
  • Salnida Y. Lumbessi
Conference paper

Abstract

The main focus of this study is on the development of Seriwe hamlet. The hamlet is located in southeastern East Lombok Regency, where 370 households earn their livelihoods by cultivating seaweed. After harvesting, the seaweed is usually dried using direct sunshine, where the seaweed is spread out on mats and frequently mixed with sand and other foreign materials. This may take 2 to 3 days or even weeks if the weather is bad. The dried seaweed is then sold to traders at a fixed price without further processing owing to a lack of processing facilities. The aim of this study was to develop a way to change this traditional method of drying using an improved hybrid solar–wind dryer that is clean and hygienic. Cash flow analysis of the hybrid solar–wind dryer demonstrates the benefits of using it when it is leased. After drying, seaweed is processed in a newly built processing building, where ten units of processing facilities are provided. The processing of seaweed uses clean water supplied from a desalination facility powered by solar photovoltaics and wind energy. The processed seaweed is expected to enjoy robust demand. This study also presents a socioeconomic analysis of Seriwe hamlet that includes the impact of the project on the welfare of the Seriwe community.

Keywords

Seaweed Processing Hybrid solar–wind dryer Energy consumption Socioeconomic study 

Notes

Acknowledgement

The authors thank Mitsui & Co. Ltd. for its support under Environment Fund K14-0705 and the Directorate General of Higher Education for its support through the MP3EI research project grant 261/SP2H/ditlitabmas/V/2012.

References

  1. 1.
    Kamaruddin A, Uyun AS, Rahman HN, dan Eri Suherman (2012) Penerapan Teknologi Berbasis Sumber Energi Terbarukan Setempat Dalam Rangka Pembangunan Sektor Perikanan, (Applications of renewable energy sources for the development of fisheries sector). Final report of MP3EIGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Kamaruddin A, Setiawan AA, Uyun AS, Rahman HN, EriSuherman, Jombrik, Sukardi (2013) Development of proper economic modeling for improving the Indonesian energy strategy in selected Indonesian villages. Support for Economic Analysis Development in Indonesia (SEADI)-A USAID project grantGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

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Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Kamaruddin
    • 1
  • Aep Saepul Uyun
    • 1
  • Herman Noer Rahman
    • 1
  • Eri Suherman
    • 1
  • Salnida Y. Lumbessi
    • 2
  1. 1.Graduate School/Renewable Energy, DarmaPersada UniversityEast JakartaIndonesia
  2. 2.Faculty of FisheriesMataram UniversityMataramIndonesia

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