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GeneralBlock: A C++ Program for Identifying and Analyzing Rock Blocks Formed by Finite-Sized Fractures

  • Lu Xia
  • Qingchun Yu
  • Youhua Chen
  • Maohua Li
  • Guofu Xue
  • Deji Chen
Part of the IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology book series (IFIPAICT, volume 448)

Abstract

GeneralBlock is a software tool for identifying and analyzing rock blocks formed by finite-sized fractures. It was developed in C++ with a friendly user interface, and can analyze the blocks of a complex-shaped modeling domain, such as slopes, tunnels, underground caverns, or their combinations. The heterogeneity of materials was taken fully into account. Both the rocks and the fractures can be heterogeneous. The program can either accept deterministic fractures obtained from a field survey, or generate random fractures by stochastic modeling. The program identifies all of the blocks formed by the excavations and the fractures, classifies the blocks, and outputs a result table that shows the type, volume, factor of safety, sliding fractures, sliding force, friction force, cohesion force, and so on for each block. It also displays three-dimensional (3D) graphics of the blocks. With GeneralBlock, rock anchors and anchor cables can be designed with the visual assistance of 3D graphics of blocks and the excavation. The anchor, cables, and blocks are shown within the same window of 3D graphics. The spatial relationship between the blocks and the anchors and cables is thus very clear.

Keywords

GeneralBlock finite-sized fracture rock block identification and analysis 

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Copyright information

© IFIP International Federation for Information Processing 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lu Xia
    • 1
  • Qingchun Yu
    • 1
  • Youhua Chen
    • 2
  • Maohua Li
    • 2
  • Guofu Xue
    • 2
  • Deji Chen
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Water Resources and Environment ScienceChina University of GeosciencesBeijingChina
  2. 2.Changjiang Conservancy CommissionYichangChina

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