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Training Support for Crisis Managers with Elements of Serious Gaming

  • Denis Havlik
  • Oren Deri
  • Kalev Rannat
  • Manuel Warum
  • Chaim Rafalowski
  • Kuldar Taveter
  • Peter Kutschera
  • Merik Meriste
Part of the IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology book series (IFIPAICT, volume 448)

Abstract

This paper presents a methodology and a prototypic software implementation of a simple system supporting resource management training for crisis managers. The application that is presented supports the execution and assessment of a desktop training for decision makers on a tactical and strategic level. It introduces elements of turn-based strategic “serious gaming”, with a possibility to roll back in time and re-try new decision paths, while keeping the graphical user interface as simple as possible. Consequently, the development efforts concentrated on: (1) formulating and executing crisis management decisions; (2) assuring responses of all simulated entities adhere to natural laws of the real world; and (3) analyzing progress and final results of the training exercise. The paper presents the lessons learned and discusses the transferability and extensibility of the proposed solution beyond the initial scenario involving accidental release of toxic gas in an urban area in Israel.

Keywords

crisis management training resource management 

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Copyright information

© IFIP International Federation for Information Processing 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Denis Havlik
    • 1
  • Oren Deri
    • 1
  • Kalev Rannat
    • 1
  • Manuel Warum
    • 1
  • Chaim Rafalowski
    • 1
  • Kuldar Taveter
    • 1
  • Peter Kutschera
    • 1
  • Merik Meriste
    • 1
  1. 1.Austrian Institute of TechnologyViennaAustria

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