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A Paradigm Shift in University Education Towards Sustainable Development

  • Dmitry PalekhovEmail author
  • Ludmila Palekhova
  • Michael Schmidt
  • Berthold Hansmann
Chapter
Part of the Natural Resource Management in Transition book series (NRMT, volume 2)

Abstract

‘Higher Education for Sustainable Development’ (HESD) is a new social phenomenon, which has grown naturally out of global efforts to implement the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and is the result of a continuous evolution of the basic concept ‘Education for Sustainable Development’ (ESD). The aim of this chapter is to explore the main expectations and necessary changes in university education in the context of a continuously evolving understanding of EDS. To achieve this aim, the chapter analyses the underlying premises and key priorities for HESD today—the time when universities all over the world are increasingly consolidating in support of SDGs. Particular attention is paid to the problem of involving technical universities from countries with economies in transition into such transformation processes. The chapter offers a historical analysis of how the role and functions of higher education, and universities in particular, in supporting the global transition to sustainable development have been changing over time. It also discusses the obstacles and challenges that prevent technical universities in countries with economies in transition from systematic and effective implementation of the HESD principles.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dmitry Palekhov
    • 1
    Email author
  • Ludmila Palekhova
    • 2
  • Michael Schmidt
    • 1
  • Berthold Hansmann
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Environmental PlanningBrandenburg University of Technology Cottbus-Senftenberg (BTU)CottbusGermany
  2. 2.Institute of Economics, National Technical University “Dnipro Polytechnic”DniproUkraine
  3. 3.Division Climate Change, Rural Development, Infrastructure, Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbHEschbornGermany

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