Advertisement

The Grand Vision of G7 in Elmau: Quo Vadis, Sustainability?

  • Katharina SerranoEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Natural Resource Management in Transition book series (NRMT, volume 2)

Abstract

Sustainability is here to stay, with or without high level processes such as the UN Agenda 2030 or the G7 commitments. There is no dispute that any kind of development needs to be sustainable for the planet, including its 7.4 billion inhabitants, flora, and fauna, to survive this millennium. However, the costs, risks, methods, approaches and scope of sustainability are disputable. These how-when-where-who-questions have often been determined—albeit not implemented—at the highest political levels. In that respect, the G7 summits must be seen as trend-setters for the international sustainability discourse and as tracks ensuring the big-picture continuity of the topic. By zeroing in on the G7 summit in Elmau in 2015, this chapter confronts some of the most intriguing and, at the same time, most complex themes surrounding sustainability in the past decade: voluntarism versus state control; global development versus sectoral approaches; and national versus internationalised initiatives.

References

  1. Assemblée Nationale (2017a) Proposition de Loi relative au devoir de vigilance des sociétés mères et des entreprises donneuses d’ordre, Texte Adopté n° 924 le 21 février 2017. http://www.assemblee-nationale.fr/14/pdf/ta/ta0924.pdf. Accessed 31 Jan 2019
  2. Assemblée Nationale (2017b) LOI n° 2017-399 du 27 mars 2017 relative au devoir de vi-gilance des sociétés mères et des entreprises donneuses d’ordre. https://www.legifrance.gouv.fr/affichTexte.do?cidTexte=JORFTEXT000034290626&dateTexte=20180225. Accessed 31 Jan 2019
  3. Bergkamp P (2017) Supply Chain Liability: The French Model. https://corporatefinancelab.org/2017/03/11/supply-chain-liability-the-french-model/. Accessed 31 Jan 2019
  4. BMZ – German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (2015a) The G7 are committed to fair trade and sustainable supply chains. https://www.bmz.de/g7/en/Entwicklungspolitische_Schwerpunkte/Menschenwuerdige_Arbeit/index.html. Accessed 31 Jan 2019
  5. BMZ – German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (2015b) Action for Fair Production, Ministerial Declaration. Meeting of the G7 Employment and Development Ministers, Berlin, 13 October 2015. https://www.bmz.de/g7/includes/Downloadarchiv/G7_Ministerial_Declaration_Action_for_Fair_Production.pdf. Accessed 31 Jan 2019
  6. Brandi CA (2016) Sustainability standards and sustainable development – synergies and trade-offs of transnational governance. Sustain Dev 25(1):25–34CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Carey C, Guttenstein E (2008) Governmental use of voluntary standards: innovation in sustainability governance. ISEAL Alliance, LondonGoogle Scholar
  8. Cossart S, Chaplier J, Beau de Lomenie T (2017) The French law on duty of care: a historic step towards making globalization work for all. Bus Hum Rights J 2(2):317–323CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Draper P, Freytag A (2014) Who captures the value in the global value chain? High level implications for the World Trade Organization. E15Initiative. International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development (ICTSD) and World Economic Forum, Geneva. http://e15initiative.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/E15-Global-Value-Chains-DraperFreytag-FINAL.pdf. Accessed 31 Jan 2019Google Scholar
  10. Elms DK, Low P (eds) (2013) Global value chains in a changing world. WTO Publications, Geneva. https://www.wto.org/english/res_e/booksp_e/aid4tradeglobalvalue13_e.pdf. Accessed 31 Jan 2019Google Scholar
  11. Fayet L, Vermeulen WJV (2014) Supporting smallholders to access sustainable supply chains: lessons from the Indian cotton supply chain. Sustain Dev 22(5):289–310CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. G7 (1991) Economic Declaration: Building World Partnership. G7 London Summit, 1991. http://www.g8.utoronto.ca/summit/1991london/communique/index.html. Accessed 31 Jan 2019
  13. G7 (2015) Leaders’ Declaration G7 Summit, Schloss Elmau, 7–8 June 2015. http://www.g7germany.de/Content/DE/_Anlagen/G7_G20/2015-06-08-g7-abschluss-eng_nn=1281552.html. Accessed 31 Jan 2019
  14. G7 Research Group (2015) Report on Civil Society and the 2015 G7 Schloss Elmau Summit. http://www.g8.utoronto.ca/evaluations/csed/2015-elmau-civilsociety.pdf. Accessed 31 Jan 2019
  15. Gaebler M (2014) Recognition of private sustainability certification systems for public regulation (co-regulation): lessons learned from the EU Renewable Energy Directive. In: Schmitz-Hoffmann C, Schmidt M, Hansmann B, Palekhov D (eds) Voluntary standard systems: a contribution to sustainable development. Natural resource management in transition, vol 1. Springer, Berlin, pp 99–112CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. GIZ – Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (2015a) The enforceability of human, social and environmental standards in the global supply chain. GIZ Study, Eschborn, GermanyGoogle Scholar
  17. GIZ – Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (2015b) The applicability of the British Transport Fuels Obligation (RTFO) in the textiles sector. GIZ Study, Eschborn, GermanyGoogle Scholar
  18. GIZ – Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (2015c) Concept note on MSI monitoring and progress reporting in context of the G7 commitments. GIZ, Eschborn, GermanyGoogle Scholar
  19. Government of Japan (2016) Ise-Shima Progress Report: G7 accountability on development and development-related commitments. http://www.mofa.go.jp/files/000158338.pdf. Accessed 31 Jan 2019
  20. GRI – Global Reporting Initiative (2017) GRI at a Glance. https://www.globalreporting.org/information/news-and-press-center/press-resources/Pages/default.aspx. Accessed 31 Jan 2019
  21. IOE – International Organisation of Employers (2015) Outcomes of the G7 Employment and Development Ministerial: “Action for Fair Production”, 12–13 October 2015. https://www.ioe-emp.org/index.php?eID=dumpFile&t=f&f=133508&token=9b1e8156d7a7bf83cfc3977a40dc743af7c1ac44. Accessed 31 Jan 2019
  22. ISEAL – International Social and Environmental Accreditation and Labelling (2011) An introduction to ISEAL: making good standards better. ISEAL Alliance, LondonGoogle Scholar
  23. ITC – International Trade Centre (2011) The impacts of private standards on global value chains. Literature review series on the impacts of private standards; Part I. ITC, Geneva. http://www.intracen.org/WorkArea/DownloadAsset.aspx?id=37609. Accessed 31 Jan 2019Google Scholar
  24. ITC – International Trade Centre (2013) LDCs and global value chains: using aid for trade to seize new opportunities. ITC, Geneva. http://www.intracen.org/LDCs-and-Global-Value-Chains/. Accessed 31 Jan 2019Google Scholar
  25. ITC – International Trade Centre (2014) Global value chains in services: a case study on Costa Rica. ITC, Geneva. http://www.intracen.org/publication/Global-value-chains-in-services-A-case-study-on-Costa-Rica/. Accessed 31 Jan 2019Google Scholar
  26. Nordic Council of Ministers (2014) The Nordic Textile Commitment: a proposal of a common quality requirement system for textile collection, sorting, reuse and recycling. http://norden.diva-portal.org/smash/get/diva2:790973/FULLTEXT01.pdf. Accessed 31 Jan 2019
  27. OECD – Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (2002) Glossary of statistical terms: regulation. https://stats.oecd.org/glossary/detail.asp?ID=3295. Accessed 31 Jan 2019
  28. OECD – Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (2013) Interconnected economies: benefiting from global value chains. Synthesis Report. https://www.oecd.org/sti/ind/interconnected-economies-GVCs-synthesis.pdf. Accessed 31 Jan 2019
  29. OECD – Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (2015) Trade policy implications of global value chains. https://www.oecd.org/tad/trade-policy-implications-gvc.pdf. Accessed 31 Jan 2019
  30. OECD – Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (2016) Multi-stakeholder initiatives and responsible business conduct. Background Note Global Forum on Responsible Business Conduct. https://mneguidelines.oecd.org/global-forum/2016-GFRBC-Session-Note-MSI-and-RBC.pdf. Accessed 31 Jan 2019
  31. OECD – Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (2017) OECD due diligence guidance for responsible supply chains in the garment and footwear sector. http://mneguidelines.oecd.org/OECD-Due-Diligence-Guidance-Garment-Footwear.pdf. Accessed 31 Jan 2019
  32. SER – Social and Economic Council of the Netherlands (2016) Agreement on sustainable garment and textile. http://www.indianet.nl/pdf/AgreementOnSustainableGarmentAndTextile.pdf. Accessed 31 Jan 2019
  33. Taglioni D, Winkler D (2016) Making global value chains work for development. Trade and development series. World Bank, Washington, D.C. https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/24426. Accessed 31 Jan 2019CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. The German Partnership for Sustainable Textiles (2014) Plan of action for the partnership for sustainable textiles. https://www.textilbuendnis.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Plan-of-action-1.0.pdf. Accessed 31 Jan 2019
  35. UK Government (2015) UK Modern Slavery Act 2015. http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2015/30/pdfs/ukpga_20150030_en.pdf. Accessed 31 Jan 2019
  36. UN – United Nations (2000) United Nations Millennium Declaration. Resolution adopted by the General Assembly on 18 September 2010, A/RES/55/2Google Scholar
  37. UN – United Nations (2015) Transforming our World: The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Resolution adopted by the General Assembly on 25 September 2015, A/RES/70/1Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.ModivendiPort VilaVanuatu

Personalised recommendations