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Functionally Driven Brain Networks Using Multi-layer Graph Clustering

  • Yasser Ghanbari
  • Luke Bloy
  • Varsha Shankar
  • J. Christopher Edgar
  • Timothy P. L. Roberts
  • Robert T. Schultz
  • Ragini Verma
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8675)

Abstract

Connectivity analysis of resting state brain has provided a novel means of investigating brain networks in the study of neurodevelopmental disorders. The study of functional networks, often represented by high dimensional graphs, predicates on the ability of methods in succinctly extracting meaningful representative connectivity information at the subject and population level. This need motivates the development of techniques that can extract underlying network modules that characterize the connectivity in a population, while capturing variations of these modules at the individual level. In this paper, we propose a multi-layer graph clustering technique that fuses the information from a collection of connectivity networks of a population to extract the underlying common network modules that serve as network hubs for the population. These hubs form a functional network atlas. In addition, our technique provides subject-specific factors designed to characterize and quantify the degree of intra- and inter- connectivity between hubs, thereby providing a representation that is amenable to group level statistical analyses. We demonstrate the utility of the technique by creating a population network atlas of connectivity by examining MEG based functional connectivity in typically developing children, and using this to describe the individualized variation in those diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder.

Keywords

Autism Spectrum Disorder Autism Spectrum Disorder Functional Connectivity Network Module Brain Connectivity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yasser Ghanbari
    • 1
  • Luke Bloy
    • 2
  • Varsha Shankar
    • 1
  • J. Christopher Edgar
    • 2
  • Timothy P. L. Roberts
    • 2
  • Robert T. Schultz
    • 2
  • Ragini Verma
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Biomedical Image Computing and AnalyticsUniversity of PennsylvaniaUSA
  2. 2.Center for Autism ResearchChildren’s Hospital of PhiladelphiaPhiladelphiaUSA

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