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Estimating a Patient Surface Model for Optimizing the Medical Scanning Workflow

  • Vivek Singh
  • Yao-jen Chang
  • Kai Ma
  • Michael Wels
  • Grzegorz Soza
  • Terrence Chen
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8673)

Abstract

In this paper, we present the idea of equipping a tomographic medical scanner with a range imaging device (e.g. a 3D camera) to improve the current scanning workflow. A novel technical approach is proposed to robustly estimate patient surface geometry by a single snapshot from the camera. Leveraging the information of the patient surface geometry can provide significant clinical benefits, including automation of the scan, motion compensation for better image quality, sanity check of patient movement, augmented reality for guidance, patient specific dose optimization, and more. Our approach overcomes the technical difficulties resulting from suboptimal camera placement due to practical considerations. Experimental results on more than 30 patients from a real CT scanner demonstrate the robustness of our approach.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vivek Singh
    • 1
  • Yao-jen Chang
    • 1
  • Kai Ma
    • 1
  • Michael Wels
    • 2
  • Grzegorz Soza
    • 2
  • Terrence Chen
    • 1
  1. 1.Imaging and Computer VisionSiemens Corporation, Corporate TechnologyPrincetonUSA
  2. 2.Healthcare SectorSiemens AGForchheimGermany

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