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Understanding Internet Use in Grassroots Campaigns: Internet and Social Movement Theory

  • Lasse BerntzenEmail author
  • Marius Rohde-Johannessen
  • James Godbolt
Chapter
Part of the Public Administration and Information Technology book series (PAIT, volume 9)

Abstract

The aim of this chapter is to shed light on the use of the Internet in grassroots campaigns. Ideas from social movement theory are used as a theoretical framework. Three different cases, spanning a period of 8 years, are examined to find development patterns. The chapter concludes with a discussion of what impact technology used by grassroots movements has on modern politics.

Keywords

Social Medium Social Movement Voter Turnout Social Movement Research Political Opportunity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lasse Berntzen
    • 1
    Email author
  • Marius Rohde-Johannessen
    • 1
  • James Godbolt
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Business and ManagementBuskerud and Vestfold University CollegeDrammenNorway
  2. 2.Department of History, Sociology and InnovationBuskerud and Vestfold University CollegeDrammenNorway

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