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Mars as a place to live? Past, present and future

  • Gerda Horneck
Part of the Studies in Space Policy book series (STUDSPACE, volume 1)

Abstract

When tackling the question of what defines a place to live, one normally considers the chemical, physical or social conditions of an environmental envelope that allows growth and propagation for a given organism or group of organisms. While the environmental tolerances of microorganisms — the only habitants on Earth for the first 2 billion years of the history of life — cover a very wide range, the environmental border lines for humans are much narrower order to make a planet habitable — at least for microbial-type of life — a minimum of environmental requirements need to be considered; these are (i) carbon-based chemistry, (ii) adequate energy sources, as well as (iii) water in its liquid phase.

Keywords

International Space Station European Space Agency Permafrost Region Habitable Zone Exploratory Mission 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag/Wien 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerda Horneck

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