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Effects of Tire Pressure on Wheelchairs When Riding on Uneven Ground

  • Shoichiro FujisawaEmail author
  • Katsuya Sato
  • Shin-ichi Ito
  • Jyunji Kawata
  • Jiro Morimoto
  • Mineo Higuchi
  • Masayuki Booka
Conference paper
  • 5 Downloads
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 1217)

Abstract

Wheelchairs for the elderly and people with disabilities are very convenient, but vibration generated during movement may cause user discomfort and even motion sickness. Tire pressure is one factor affecting wheelchair ride quality. The commonly used English-style valve for wheelchairs allows air to be filled into the tire but cannot be used to adjust tire air pressure. Therefore, it is unclear how wheelchair tire pressure affects the vibration of the wheelchair. Additionally, it is necessary to consider the burden on the assistant. Wheelchairs are often used indoors on hard floors and relatively flexible carpets. The purpose of this study is to clarify the relationship between vibrations generated in a wheelchair, the surface on which a wheelchair travels, tire pressure, and the influence of these vibrations on the human body. By using an air pressure indicator suitable for use with the English-style valve to measure tire air pressure, vibration measurements were conducted under controlled conditions by rolling a manual wheelchair at constant speed. The vibration test revealed that the vibration tends to increase as tire pressure increases. Additionally, it was found that ride comfort decreases as tire pressure increases.

Keywords

Wheelchair Tire pressure Traveling over a level difference Vibration Sensory evaluation 

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Copyright information

© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shoichiro Fujisawa
    • 1
    Email author
  • Katsuya Sato
    • 2
  • Shin-ichi Ito
    • 2
  • Jyunji Kawata
    • 1
  • Jiro Morimoto
    • 1
  • Mineo Higuchi
    • 1
  • Masayuki Booka
    • 3
  1. 1.Faculty of Science and EngineeringTokushima Bunri UniversitySanukiJapan
  2. 2.Institute of Technology and ScienceTokushima UniversityTokushimaJapan
  3. 3.NPO Yuto-no-TsumugiKochiJapan

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