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PC-Based Simulation Environment for the Engine Control Optimiser Hardware-in-the-Loop Testing

Conference paper
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Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 1196)

Abstract

This paper describes a motion simulator for testing a device that optimises fuel consumption along vehicle journey in real-time. The specific case of an original vehicle engine control system is considered. The PC application based on the Qt framework is written in Python. It allows to quickly run Hardware-in-the-Loop tests of optimiser instead of running them on the real test track. By using the CAN interface, tests with connection to simulator are interchangeable with those made using full-scale vehicle. This significantly shortens the entire process of developing an automatic vehicle engine control system. The open and modular architecture of the source code allows any modification and development of the application depending on the user-specific demands.

Keywords

Car simulator Fuel consumption optimisation Hardware-in-the-Loop Optimiser-simulator architecture Python PyQt SciPy 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Control and Computation EngineeringWarsaw University of TechnologyWarsawPoland

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