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Sustainable Development in Higher Education

  • Marcin GerykEmail author
Conference paper
  • 11 Downloads
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 1209)

Abstract

Public discussion on the role and responsibility of higher education institutions in shaping society of the future began in 2001 [1] The answer to the question of how sustainable development should be understood and what it brings for universities came from the World Commission on Environment and Development in 1987 which described sustainable development as “meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs”. The future role of the university should be widely discussed. Education provided outside of higher education institutions should also be considered as important for society. The system of higher education needs reshaping to become more transdisciplinary, open to eliminate barriers and ready for new partnerships.

Keywords

Sustainable development Higher education University 

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Copyright information

© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The Faculty of Management and Social CommunicationJagiellonian UniversityCracowPoland

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