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Multi Actuation Scheme for Path-Following Control of Autonomous Vehicles

  • Javad AhmadiEmail author
  • Efstathios Velenis
  • Heimoud El Vagha
  • Chenhui Lin
  • Boyuan Li
  • Stefano Longo
  • Efstathios Siampis
Conference paper
  • 64 Downloads
Part of the Mechanisms and Machine Science book series (Mechan. Machine Science, volume 84)

Abstract

This paper presents a Multi actuation scheme for path following control of autonomous vehicles. Steering angle of front and rear axles accompanied with wheel torques of front axle and individual left and right wheels of the rear axle are the five control inputs of the system. The required feedback outputs of the system consist of lateral offset, heading angle error and forward speed of the vehicle and their time derivative. In the high-level layer of the controller, zeroing the two path states: lateral offset and heading angle error, and tracking in the longitudinal velocity are targeted by decentralization of proportional-derivative controllers. The high-level part outputs the desired generalized forces and moment on the vehicle body-fixed coordinate. These desired values are tackled by the control inputs through an allocation scheme. The capability of the proposed closed-loop system is analyzed through nonlinear numerical simulations.

Keywords

Autonomous vehicle Path following Multi actuation 

Notes

Acknowledgment

Research supported by Innovate UK through AID-CAD project.

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Copyright information

© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Javad Ahmadi
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Efstathios Velenis
    • 1
  • Heimoud El Vagha
    • 1
  • Chenhui Lin
    • 1
  • Boyuan Li
    • 1
  • Stefano Longo
    • 1
  • Efstathios Siampis
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Automotive Engineering, School of Aerospace, Transport and ManufacturingCranfield UniversityCranfieldUK
  2. 2.Department of Mechanical EngineeringPayame Noor UniversityTehranIran

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